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© 2018 by Morgan Blair

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Bank of America

'Life's better when we're connected'

 

BOA Real Estate Dashboard

The Problem:

Bank of America had an issue with the number of people staying on their real-estate platform when other services (like Zillow or Redfin) had the ability to save properties or searches. To compete with this functionality, they needed to present all of their services in a format that was conducive to repeated use.

The Solution:

The "Real Estate Center Dashboard" allows customers to create a homepage of their own that saves and updates automatically as their tastes or requirements change. It's a central hub for everything a customer might need to find and purchase a home in one location.

My Role:

UX Designer (Individual Project), UX Analyst, UI Designer

Tools:

inVision (Prototype), Sketch (Wireframes and Visual Design), Pen and Paper (Storyboarding), UserTesting.com, Jira

Variations

The emails that Bank of America was sending out were inconsistent in design, and not rendering well on many browsers. Here are examples of the worst cases.

Blank Page

With lending officer invite

Final Results

Here are the final results of the Bank of America Real Estate Dashboard. Desktop, Tablet, and Web compatible forms of this page were created through a team in Chennai where it was my responsibility to work with QA to meet up with them for 2 hours weekly and make sure that the page was produced correctly. 

What did I learn?

Working with Bank of America was very intimidating, but also very interesting. We do a lot of work with them but this was my first project done alone with them. Learning to manage expectations, gather requirements, and deliver a product that could be feasibly built in a short window was a great challenge but one that pushed me to spend much time overthinking my solutions.

I learned that I can tackle any problem I put my mind to. I just need to remain persistent but counter-intuitively willing to give up a pet idea. Working on something for several weeks doesn't make it inherently valuable. I need to be aware of the "sunk cost fallacy" when designing, just because I spent weeks on an idea doesn't make it valuable. Starting over is nearly always a good idea, I can only do better next time.

 

Bank of America Email Redesign

The Problem:

We had been working with Xome's sales department and realized that mocking up the full site for each potential client would become unreasonable fairly quickly. Clients wanted to see what they would be paying for, but for live demonstrations, it was difficult to sell them on a competitor branded site.

The Solution:

"Upward Blue Loans" allowed Xome to create just a few branded mockups for potential clients while still giving them full access to an unbranded working site. 

My Role:

UX Designer (Individual Project)

UX Researcher

Tools:

inVision (Prototype), Sketch (Wireframes and Visual Design), Pen and Paper (Storyboarding)

Process

Value Proposition

The emails that Bank of America was sending out were inconsistent in design, and not rendering well on many browsers. Here are examples of the worst cases.

Prototypes

The instructions I was given were explicit to keep everything the same as it was. This meant that I 

2nd Iteration

As I was presenting I discovered that the MLO's themselves had designed these emails, and as such had made themselves very large and that wasn't necessary. This helped my designs a lot as the meeting also exposed that they weren't as strict about the design of this email as they had previously implied.

Final Email Design

Keeping consistency was the biggest thing we could do to improve these emails, however, the idea of "conveying the importance of the interaction" was still seen as something that needed gaudy design solutions. Instead, I gave it space to breathe and hold importance without conveying the idea of spam.

What did I learn?

Working with Bank of America was very intimidating, but also very interesting. We do a lot of work with them but this was my first project done alone with them. Learning to manage expectations, gather requirements, and deliver a product that could be feasibly built in a short window was a great challenge but one that pushed me to spend much time overthinking my solutions.

I learned that I can tackle any problem I put my mind to. I just need to remain persistent but counter-intuitively willing to give up a pet idea. Working on something for several weeks doesn't make it inherently valuable. I need to be aware of the "sunk cost fallacy" when designing, just because I spent weeks on an idea doesn't make it valuable. Starting over is nearly always a good idea, I can only do better next time.